Climate & Weather

The climate of Prachuap Khiri Khan is generally tropical –- warm, wet and humid for much of the year,  with extended spells of mild and dry weather, especially in the northern part of the province.

Precipitation

Depending on the district and time of year, Prachuap Khiri Khan recieves between 700 to 1,100 millimeters of rain annually.

This rain chart shows rain measurements in Prachuap Khiri Khan provincial district’s Koh Lak sub-district in 2018 (up until December 10). Credit: ThaiWater.net

Temperatures

Though March and April temperatures tend to peak in the upper 30s and regularly breaching 40 degrees Celsius at the height of summer, the ‘winter’ (December and January) weather is mild and even chilly, especially in the mornings, increasingly dropping below 20 degrees C.

This temperature range chart shows measured temperatures in Prachuap Khiri Khan’s Koh Lak sub district from October 2011 to December 10 2018. Credit: Thaiwater.net

Seasons

Prachuap Khiri Khan Province typically has three seasons as follows:

1. Summer or hot season (in Thai ‘radoo rawn’ ฤดูร้อน) typically starts in March, and lasts until June. The hot and humid weather during this period is a product of convective forces originating in the South China Sea. It is usually drier in March and April, but not uncommon for rain.

2. The rainy season (in Thai ‘radoo fon’ ฤดูฝน) typically comes to Prahuap in July, and lasts till November, influenced by the East Asia monsoon. October and November are statistically the wettest months of the year in Prachuap.

3. By December, Prachuap enters into its cool and/or dry season. Temperatures are generally lowest in January, and many weeks and even months can pass in between rains during this period.

Generally speaking, the northern part of Prachuap Khiri Khan has historically (30-50 years) been drier than the southern part.

Note: Typical weather and seasonal patterns may or may not persist ‘as usual’ from 2016 to 2030, as the expanding and shifting Intercontinental Tropical Convergence Zone affects jet stream patterns due to increased cosmic ray influence during Solar Cycles 24 and 25.

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